Natto
Home ] Up ] Lumbrokinase ] Bromelain ] [ Natto ] Serrapeptase ] Wobenzym ]

 

Natto or Nattokinase is an enzyme that exhibits strong fibrinolytic activity. Natto is a kind of fermented soy bean-cheese used in Japan. This characteristic is not from the soy but the fermentation (produced from Bacillus subtilis). It is available in many Asian grocery stores (refrigerated) and has a nutty taste (may take a little time to 'acquire' a taste for it).

See: http://www.jafra.gr.jp/natto-e.html

I found that although it takes a few days to get accustomed to its unusual texture and taste, that I had a "healthy craving" for it 1-2 times a week. I noticed a jump in mental clarity - suggesting that it affect different coagulation products than [piracetam, serrapeptase, lumbrokinase or bromelain] did not effect. We are very fortunate as we can get 5-6 different types at our local grocery store.

In late 2003, my daughter and wife started taking Natto-K. Both of them found significant improvement within one week (2 capsules per day).

Benefits

  • appear to reduce lipid peroxidation and improve lipid metabolism.
  • enhancement of the fibrinolytic activity, increase production of tissue plasminogen activator.
  • "inactivates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and then potentiates fibrinolytic activity"
  • having four times greater fibrinolytic activity than plasmin.
  • help to prevent arteriosclerosis, as they appear to reduce lipid peroxidation and improve lipid metabolism
  • Increased activated factor VII levels

 

Risks

  • good dietary source of vitamin K.
  • potential interference with oral anticoagulant treatment
  • High tyramines content - do not use if you are sensitive to moldy or fermented foods (blue cheese, pickled herring, anchovies for example)

Sources

Care should be taken with mixtures -- often they have a high percentage of cheaper components. (2004) Prices has come down.  FU indicates the amount of active ingredients.

 

Google

Home

Original 2001 WebSite as PDF for download

Looking for something, look in the Contents or do a Site Search